HUD ANNOUNCES NEW FHA OWNER OCCUPANCY REQUIREMENTS

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (“HUD”), recently published Mortgagee Letter 2016-15, which modified the owner occupancy requirements for condominium associations seeking Federal Housing Administration (“FHA”) approval.  Prior to the adoption of Mortgagee Letter 2016-15, a condominium association with an owner occupancy rate of under fifty percent (50%) could not be granted FHA approval.  With the adoption of Mortgagee Letter 2016-15, however, condominium associations with owner occupancy rates as low as thirty-five percent (35%) may be eligible for FHA approval, provided they meet certain additional requirements.

Specifically, a condominium association with an owner occupancy rate between thirty-five percent (35%) and fifty percent (50%) may be eligible for FHA approval if it meets the following additional requirements:

 1.  The association’s financial documents (i.e. budget, balance sheet, and income and expense statement) provide for the funding of replacement reserves for capital expenditures and deferred maintenance at a level of at least twenty percent (20%) of the total annual budget for the association.

     For condominium associations with an owner occupancy rate of at least fifty percent (50%), the reserve contribution requirement is ten percent (10%) of the annual budget.  So, HUD’s minimum reserve contribution requirement for associations with under fifty percent (50%) owner occupancy rates is double the minimum reserve contribution requirement for associations with at least fifty percent (50%) owner occupancy rates.

2.  No more than ten percent (10%) of the total units in the association may be delinquent by more than sixty (60) days on assessment payments to the association.

     For condominium associations with an owner occupancy rate of at least fifty percent (50%), the delinquency requirement is that no more than fifteen percent (15%) of the total units in the association may be delinquent by more than sixty (60) days on assessment payments to the association.  So, HUD is requiring associations with under fifty percent (50%) owner occupancy rates to have significantly fewer units delinquent by more than sixty (60) days on assessment payments to the association then it requires for associations with at least fifty percent (50%) owner occupancy rates.

3.   The association must provide financial documents (i.e. budget, balance sheet, and income and expense statement) for the previous three (3) years.

      For condominium associations with an owner occupancy rate of at least fifty percent (50%), HUD requires only the current year budget, a balance sheet that is no more than ninety (90) days old, and an income and expense statement from the prior fiscal year end as well as one that is no more than ninety (90) days old.  Thus, HUD is requiring associations with under fifty percent (50%) owner occupancy rates to provide financial documents for two (2) additional prior fiscal years as compared to what it requires for associations with at least fifty percent (50%) owner occupancy rates.

4.   The association must apply for FHA approval through the HRAP process.

The HRAP process means the association submits its application directly to a HUD office for review.  Associations with at least fifty percent (50%) owner occupancy rates also have the ability to apply for FHA approval through the DELRAP process, whereby an authorized lender has the ability to grant the association FHA approval.  It would appear that the DELRAP process is not available for associations with under fifty percent (50%) owner occupancy rates.

 

These new owner occupancy requirements announced by HUD should permit additional condominium associations to obtain FHA approval, provided that an association with an owner occupancy rate between thirty-five percent (35%) and fifty percent (50%) can also meet the new financial requirements set forth by HUD.  If your condominium association is considering applying for FHA approval and would like assistance with this process, please feel free to contact our office and one of our attorneys would be happy to assist you.

This article is being provided for informational purposes only.  This article does not constitute legal advice on the part of Keay & Costello, P.C. or any of its attorneys.  No association, board member or any other individual or entity should rely on this article as a basis for any action or actions.  If you would like legal advice regarding any of the topics discussed in this article and/or recommended procedures for your association going forward, please contact our office.